Chemical Patch Tests

  • Contacts

  • Address

    1305 York Avenue 9th Floor New York, NY 10021

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  • Phone

    (212) 123-4567

  • Fax

    (212) 123-8387

  • Email

    dr.email@yourdomain.com

  • Working Hours

    • Monday - Friday
      8.00 - 17.00
    • Saturday
      9.00 - 16.00
    • Friday
      9.30 - 14.00

Chemical Patch Tests

In our world today, we are often exposed to so many chemicals, for example from day to day usage of soaps, cosmetics, hair dye and of course chemicals which we are exposed to in an occupational setting.

We are one of the few private allergy centers that are able to test patients for a number of different chemicals. ranging from cosmetics, occupational health exposure and even have been asked to test for possible to artificial hip/ knees and even heart implants

We have a range of patch tests available and some are bespoke to particular indications. Again, using the best and most respected materials from Smart-Practice in Denmark (TRUE- Test), Chemotechnique in France – we are able to ascertain if some chemicals you are exposed to are causing potential reactions.

The 3 -4 patch tests are applied on a clean back on Monday in my Clinic in the Beacon and then the patches are removed 48 hours (Wednesday) later and finally read 96 hours later (Friday) – during the 5 days, you are not allowed to wet your back or take antihistamines or steroids.

Should you be allergic to a particular chemical, the area affected will become red and irritated and graded according to the strength of the reaction.

The reaction then fades after the end of the test in a few days but in rare cases the irritation may persist for a few days and rarely for a few weeks or months thereafter.

At the end of the patch test, we will then do our best to tell you where these chemicals may be found in typical settings. This is not always possible especially in occupational settings.

We also have a big and specialised Hair Dressing panel to test patients after some have unfortunate or suspect that they may have suffered from reactions after applied Hair Dye to their hair.

They can then ensure that chemical is not used in the future to colour their hair.

Contact us for pricing and more information – bespoke testing for rare items may be done on request.

Please find more information about the tests at the following links:

T.R.U.E Test
SmartPractice.dk
Chemotechnique.se/patchtesting

Our Services

  • Initial Consultation (Dr. Ranbir Kaulsay) – €120.00 – €165.00
  • Outdoor Checkup – $85
  • Emergency Care – $120
  • Operation Theater – $260
  • Blood Test – $10

Tests

  • Skin Prick Test and Report – €300.00
  • Dental – $85
  • Neurology – $120
  • Cardiology – $260
  • Orthopedics – $10

Investigations

  • Colonoscopy – $105
  • Ultrasonography – $85
  • X-ray – $120
  • Electrocardiography – $260
  • Sigmoidoscopy – $10
What is a Patch Test? (Smart Practice Dermatology / Allergy)

A Patch test is a patch testing procedure to diagnose allergic contact dermatitis, whereas the diagnosis of irritant contact dermatitis is based on exclusion of an allergic component. Patch test techniques for diagnosing ACD have been used for over 100 years and the present test methods are based on the established principle of using a testing material (chemical, food etc.) and a delivery device (chamber).

What is Patch Testing?

Patch testing attempts to reproduce the allergic reaction on the normal skin on the upper back of the patient. The patches are applied and subsequently removed after 48 hours. Reactions are read after 72 – 96 hours and often, again at 7 days after removal. The diagnostic value of patch testing depends upon the choice of test substance, the vehicle, the concentration, results interpretation and patient counseling. Patch tests are comprised of materials that occur in the home, work and/or recreational environment.

Patch Testing for Proper Diagnosis of Contact Dermatitis

Appropriate diagnosis and management of persistent eczematous conditions such as contact dermatitis are common challenges for the dermatologist when patch testing. In 2008, the prevalence of contact dermatitis in the general U.S. population was variably estimated between 1.5% and 5.4% and reported to be the third most common reason for patients to seek consultation with a dermatologist, accounting for 9.2 million visits in 2004. It also accounts for 95% of all reported occupational skin diseases.

Contact allergen skin testing is a simple and objective scientific method available to physicians to augment the diagnostic process. Often, the patch test response is the crucial piece of information that allows for the early identification of the offending allergen(s) and confirmation of a diagnosis of Allergic Contact Dermatitis (ACD) and/or Irritant Contact Dermatitis (ICD). Once a diagnosis is achieved, the patient can then take appropriate action to avoid exposure to the allergen and, if possible, substitute non-allergenic agents.

About Working Schedule

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Holiday Schedule

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Next Month Meetings

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What is a Patch Test? (Smart Practice Dermatology / Allergy)?

A Patch test is a patch testing procedure to diagnose allergic contact dermatitis, whereas the diagnosis of irritant contact dermatitis is based on exclusion of an allergic component. Patch test techniques for diagnosing ACD have been used for over 100 years and the present test methods are based on the established principle of using a testing material (chemical, food etc.) and a delivery device (chamber).

What is Patch Testing?

Patch testing attempts to reproduce the allergic reaction on the normal skin on the upper back of the patient. The patches are applied and subsequently removed after 48 hours. Reactions are read after 72 – 96 hours and often, again at 7 days after removal. The diagnostic value of patch testing depends upon the choice of test substance, the vehicle, the concentration, results interpretation and patient counseling. Patch tests are comprised of materials that occur in the home, work and/or recreational environment.

What is Contact Dermatitis?

Contact dermatitis is an inflammation of the skin at the area of contact. There are two types of contact dermatitis – irritant and allergic. Symptoms include itching, redness, warmth, swelling, cracking, pain, scaling and crusting. Skin can crack, bleed and ooze, depending on the severity of the reaction. Dermatitis can occur from exposure to the environment (such as dry weather), chemicals (such as harsh soaps), allergens (such as nickel) and physical trauma (such as abrasion). Your physician may diagnose irritant or allergic contact dermatitis from your medical history, occupation, symptoms, and patch testing. Treatment of both irritant and allergic contact dermatitis is based on avoiding contact with the substance(s) that caused the reaction.

What is Irritant Contact Dermatitis (ICD)?

This non-specific inflammatory condition develops after skin is exposed to substances that are physically, chemically or mechanically traumatizing. Symptoms are usually confined to the area of contact, recur with additional irritant exposure and may be difficult to distinguish from allergic contact dermatitis.

Irritant contact dermatitis occurs in response to irritating substances such as household cleaners, harsh soaps and industrial solvents. Your skin can react to these substances within minutes or hours, and stops reacting soon after they are gone.

What is Allergic Contact Dermatitis (ACD)?

Allergic contact dermatitis occurs from a person’s immune response to contact allergens, such as fragrances, preservatives, nickel, gold, and many others. Allergic reactions to contact allergens develop hours or days after exposure, and may take weeks to heal. A personal or family history of other allergies may increase a person’s chance of developing this skin condition.

In already sensitized individuals, this immunologic response is elicited by contact with a specific allergen or closely related chemical. Symptoms typically manifest 24 to 72 hours after allergen exposure, vary in intensity and often include itching and vesiculation. More than 3,000 chemicals are reportedly capable of causing allergic contact dermatitis but relatively few allergens account for most cases. These common allergens form the basis of diagnostic patch testing that is used to differentiate allergic from irritant contact dermatitis.

Allergic contact dermatitis is responsible for approximately half of all contact dermatitis cases. Patients with persistent, unresolved contact dermatitis can suffer for years with a diminished quality of life and increased medical treatment costs. However, the condition can be effectively treated once an accurate diagnosis is obtained.

How Prevalent is Contact Dermatitis?

Allergen exposure is influenced by climate, occupation, cultural habits, and regulations. The prevalence of contact allergy against specific allergens differs among countries as a result in changes and developments in surrounding environments and societies. (Thyssen et al 2007) In the United States, estimates of prevalence range from 5% to 50%, depending on population and defining criteria. According to a 2005 report by The Society for Investigative Dermatology and The American Academy of Dermatology, contact dermatitis is associated with more than 9 million physician office visits and as many as 10% of all dermatology clinic visits. Treating contact dermatitis costs approximately $1.4 billion annually, with significant losses (~$500 million) attributed to missed workdays and low productivity. (Bickers et al. 2006) In the UK, occupational contact dermatitis is the most frequently reported occupational skin disease in developed countries and accounts for between 70% and 90% of all reported cases of occupational skin disease. The annual population incidence of occupational contact dermatitis ranges from an estimated 5.7 to 101 cases per 100,000 workers per year. The most reliable studies estimate the incidence to be between 11 and 86 cases per 100 000 workers per year. (Nicholson et al. 2010) Experts believe these numbers may underestimate the impact of contact dermatitis.

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